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LIST OF SCIENTIFIC PROGRAMS

A Nordita Scientific Program is an extended workshop where a limited number of scientists work together on specific topics for a period of up to 4 weeks. Nordita also organizes Workshops, Conferences and Meetings, ranging from a few days up to a week.

Current Program

There is currently no program running at Nordita.
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Future Events

2017

Phase Transitions in Astrophysics, from ISM to Planets

Program

7 May — 2 June 2017

Coordinators: Fabio Del Sordo, Wladimir Lyra, Evangelia Ntormousi, Pascal Tremblin

www.nordita.org/pta2017

Phase transitions occur constantly in the interstellar medium and to a large degree define star and planet formation. The transition from atomic to molecular gas sets the initial conditions for star formation, while the formation and destruction mechanisms of dust and other solids is the basis for understanding the origins of planets. This program aims to bring together experts in ISM dynamics, planet formation, exoplanet atmosphere, and planetary ices, from both modeling and observations to study this problem in detail.

The Physics of Extreme-Gravity Stars

Program

5—30 June 2017

Coordinators: Melvyn Davies, Rob Fender, Johan Fynbo, Shri Kulkarni, Samaya Nissanke, Eran Ofek

www.nordita.org/egs2017

Massive stars, almost always found in pairs, evolve and end their lives as extreme-gravity compact objects - white dwarfs, neutron stars and black holes. Binary stellar interactions and gravitational radiation drive these two objects together resulting in their mergers. Such mergers are widely accepted to give rise to a host of the most energetic transient events known in the Universe. By critically assessing binary stellar interactions and evolution, this program will bring together theorists, computational astrophysicists, observers, and instrumentalists for a period of three weeks. Our aim is to systematically connect the binary progenitors through the complex merger physics to the myriad of observed and predicted cosmic transient events. This multidisciplinary program is urgent since the maximum scientific return of these new observatories and instruments will rely on the program’s deliverables. The timeliness of the program is further underlined as instruments, such as LIGO and Virgo, will constrain the rates of neutron star-neutron star and neutron star-black hole mergers within the next five years.

Advances in Theoretical Cosmology in Light of Data

Program

3—28 July 2017

Coordinators: Katherine Freese, Martina Gerbino, Jon Gudmundsson, Shirley Ho, Ingunn Wehus

www.nordita.org/advcosmo2017

What is the expansion history of the Universe? What are dark energy and dark matter? Is Einstein’s theory of gravity valid on cosmological scales? What generated the initial perturbations that grew into stars and galaxies? We are gradually developing the observational and theoretical prowess to tackle the most fundamental unknowns of our Universe, the nature of dark matter and dark energy, and to shed light on the dark ages spanning the dawn of time to the birth of the first star. Through observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background and Large Scale Structure we are unravelling this cosmic puzzle while constraining the inflationary physics that we believe is responsible for generating the primordial perturbations, the seeds of our universe. By complementing these studies with information from cosmological messengers, such as neutrinos and gravitational waves, we link our cosmological understanding to fundamental physics. The challenge for further progress lies at the intersection of these thrusts; strong interactions and collaborations between the theory and observations are required to answer key questions of modern day cosmology.

Topological Phases in Cold Atom Systems

Program

31 July — 18 August 2017

Coordinators: Eddy Ardonne, Markus Hennrich, Jonas Larson, Susanne Viefers

www.nordita.org/tpcas2017

Topological phases play an important role in condensed matter physics for understanding quantum effects like topological insulators and the quantum Hall effect. At the same time, cold atoms and ions have matured as a testbed to study complex quantum systems and are now used to generate, visualize and understand topological quantum states and phases. This program will bring together researchers from condensed matter and atomic physics, to share their knowledge how to describe and investigate topological quantum systems and to inspire collaborations between researchers of the two fields.

Current and Future Trends in Stochastic Thermodynamics

Program

4—29 September 2017

Coordinators: Erik Aurell, Bart Cleuren, Astrid de Wijn, Ralf Eichhorn

www.nordita.org/st2017

Stochastic thermodynamics is a recently established discipline of statistical physics. It aims to apply and extend thermodynamic principles to the non equilibrium regime. In particular, it provides an adequate framework to investigate the behaviour of small systems. The salient property of stochastic thermodynamics is the incorporation of fluctuations, which are prominent on that scale. In combination with the constraints put forth by macroscopic thermodynamics, a number of important fundamental results were established, e.g. the fluctuation theorems. Stochastic thermodynamics is by now a rapidly evolving field, with an increasing range of applications. The aim of this program to discuss the latest developments and open problems in Stochastic Thermodynamics.

Past Events

2016

Dark Matter Distribution in the Era of Gaia

Program

10 October — 4 November 2016

Coordinators: James Binney, Wyn Evans, Malcolm Fairbairn, Benoit Famaey, Sofia Feltzing, David W. Hogg, Giacomo Monari, Arnaud Siebert, Joseph Silk, Douglas Spolyar, Monica Valluri

www.nordita.org/dm2016

Dark Matter (DM) binds our galaxy together and is at the heart of modern cosmology. The current Lambda Cold DM paradigm has had great success on large scales, but a detailed understanding of the distribution of DM on smaller scales is still lacking where new data from Gaia could challenge the CDM scenario or rule out competing models such as warm dark matter. Gaia will measure the proper motion and distances of on the order of a billion stars in the Milky Way's disk, bulge and halo, as well as in a few individual Milky Way satellites. The focus of the workshop is to bring theorists (particle physicists and astrophysicists), modelers, and observers together in order to discuss ideas, methods, and modeling to focus our understanding of the local universe revealed by Gaia at a critical time when the first data from Gaia will become available.

Physics of Turbulent Combustion

Program

5—30 September 2016

Coordinators: Xue-Song Bai, Geert Brethouwer, Christer Fureby, Nils E. Haugen, Elaine Oran, Nedunchezhian Swaminathan

www.nordita.org/combustion2016

Turbulent combustion is not only a part of our daily life (e.g. in combustion engines that power road vehicles, airplanes, space vehicles and ships, as well as in power plants and numerous industrial sectors), but also it is the key process in supernovae explosions and thermo-nuclear fusion. Turbulence itself is a challenging research area and over the past few decades a significant development in experiments and high fidelity modeling has been made. Combustion is a multi-scale physico-chemical process involving reactions with a range of time scales and when coupled with turbulence they occur also in different spatial locations. Depending on the mixture composition, temperature, pressure and flow conditions rich combustion phenomena can occur: ignition, quenching, deflagration and detonation wave propagation, formation of pollutants, supernovae explosion, etc.

Black Holes and Emergent Spacetime

Program

8 August — 2 September 2016

Coordinators: Monica Guica, Niels Obers, Bo Sundborg, Lárus Thorlacius

www.nordita.org/bh2016

This Nordita Program will develop two interrelated themes to provide new insights into the underlying holographic structure of space-time and the quantum nature of black holes. We will focus on the interplay between quantum entanglement, entropy and the emergence of space-time from quantum field theory in the context of holographic dualities. A parallel theme involves extending the notion of holographic duality to more general classes of space-times. Widening the scope of the holographic paradigm will open up new avenues for applied holography and may shed light on some deep puzzles in quantum cosmology. The program aims at bringing together experts in this exciting research field and introduce PhD students and younger researchers to these developments.

Multi-Component and Strongly-Correlated Superconductors

Program

4—29 July 2016

Coordinators: Daniel Agterberg, Egor Babaev, Karen Michaeli, Asle Sudbø, Oskar Vafek

www.nordita.org/sc2016

Modern condensed matter systems of interest, including those which display the highest superconducting transition temperatures, tend to exhibit a complex interplay of many-body ordering tendencies with ensuing multicomponent field theories. Understanding the microscopic origin and the phenomenology of such interplay has been among the most active frontiers of research in recent years. The goal of the workshop is to bring together experts working on various aspects of the field to share their latest development and spark future collaborations. The workshop will cover a wide range of topics such as: superconductivity in iron-pnictides, cuprates, and in materials without inversion symmetry, as well as other systems with unconventional pairing symmetry.

Aspect of Amplitudes

Program

13 June — 2 July 2016

Coordinators: Nima Arkani-Hamed, Zvi Bern, Ruth Britto, Paolo Di Vecchia, Henrik Johansson

www.nordita.org/aspects2016

Scattering amplitudes in relativistic quantum theories possess a multitude of remarkable hidden structures and correspondences. They are of vital importance for high-precision comparisons of theory and experiment at the LHC, yet they also have the promise of revealing fundamentally new approaches to quantum field theory and of exposing interrelations that unify gauge theories, gravity, and string theory. This program will provide a meeting ground to communicate the current themes and recent progress in various areas of theoretical physics touched by scattering amplitudes. This includes N=4 SYM, higher-loop QCD, perturbative gravity, string amplitudes, polylogarithms, Grassmannians and the amplituhedron, soft theorems, twistor strings, color-kinematics duality and double-copy properties of gravity, supergravity UV behavior, and more.

From Quantum Field Theories to Numerical Methods

Program

2—27 May 2016

Coordinators: Eddy Ardonne, Maria Hermanns, Frank Pollmann, Susanne Viefers

www.nordita.org/qftnum2016

Quantum field theoretical concepts are an essential tool for the understanding of a wide range of problems in condensed matter theory including the theory of quantum phase transitions, the quantum Hall effects, and frustrated spin systems. While field theories provide an effective description and capture the universal features, they cannot usually be directly related to microscopic models. Here numerical tools are of great importance to tackle quantum many-body problems starting from microscopic Hamiltonians. Over the past decades, several new numerical tools have been developed, including tensor product state based methods, multi-scale entanglement renormalization group methods and new quantum Monte Carlo methods.

Holography and Dualities 2016: New Advances in String and Gauge Theory

Program

30 March — 22 April 2016

Coordinators: Sergei Gukov, Charlotte Kristjansen, Olof Ohlsson Sax, Bogdan Stefanski, Konstantin Zarembo

www.nordita.org/holography2016

The holographic duality has provided new insights into the physics of strongly-coupled systems by bridging together different subjects that before were thought to be completely unrelated, such as hydrodynamics and physics of black holes, string theory and strongly-coupled phenomena in condensed-matter physics, integrable systems and and non-perturbative behavior of gauge fields. Symmetries have played an important role in these developments and have led to development of new non-perturbative methods based for example on integrability, bootstrap and localization. The aim of the program is to discuss new developments in dualities and holography, with focus on gauge/string dualities, integrability, symmetries in string theory, supersymmetric localization, bootstrap methods, applications of holography in QCD and condensed-matter systems.

2015

Stochastic Thermodynamics in Biology

Program

21 September — 16 October 2015

Coordinators: Erik Aurell, Astrid de Wijn, Ralf Eichhorn

www.nordita.org/stbio2015

"Stochastic Thermodynamics" represents an exciting new research direction in statistical physics, which explores fundamental aspects of non-equilibrium processes. The common idea is to adapt and generalize concepts from equilibrium thermodynamics to the non-equilibrium realm, typically on the level of single particle trajectories monitored over the entire system evolution. The program intends to gather the world-leading experts to explore the possibilities of applying the tools of Stochastic Thermodynamics to open questions in biological systems, mainly on the cellular and molecular level.

Physics of Interfaces and Layered Structures

Program

24 August — 11 September 2015

Coordinators: David Abergel, Alexander Balatsky, Annica Black-Schaffer, Philip Hofmann, Yoshihiro Iwasa

www.nordita.org/pils2015

A major direction of research in contemporary condensed matter physics is the effort to design materials with specific functionality by utilizing the unique properties of interfaces between materials of different types. The prospect of using two-dimensional interfaces between two-dimensional layers at the nanoscale provides many potential avenues for tailoring materials. The program brings together world leaders in the fields of superconductivity and Dirac materials and young researchers from the Nordic region who can learn from them.

Magnetic Reconnection in Plasmas

Program

27 July — 21 August 2015

Coordinators: Yuri Khotyaintsev, Stefano Markidis, Åke Nordlund, Andris Vaivads

www.nordita.org/mrp2015

Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental multi­scale plasma process responsible for plasma transport, plasma heating and acceleration of energetic particles in many astrophysical environments, ranging from planetary magnetospheres and solar wind to solar flares, accretion disk corona, and other astrophysical plasmas. The major goal of this program is to increase the knowledge about the magnetic reconnection process in astrophysical plasma environments based on synergies between the studies of magnetic reconnection remotely, in situ, in numerical simulations and in laboratories.

Origin, Evolution, and Signatures of Cosmological Magnetic Fields

Program

15 June — 10 July 2015

Coordinators: Axel Brandenburg, Tina Kahniashvili, Tanmay Vachaspati

www.nordita.org/cmf2015

Focus themes during this program will be: observations, observational tools, prospects; MHD in cosmology and origin of magnetic fields; and magnetized structures. There will be a conference during the second week.

Control of Ultrafast Quantum Phenomena

Program

18 May — 12 June 2015

Coordinators: Jan Petter Hansen, Eva Lindroth, Esa Räsänen

www.nordita.org/ultrafast2015

The aim is to study quantum control and dynamics of few-particle systems in an active collaborative effort between experimentalists and theorists, as well as between recognized senior researchers and young investigators. The activity is motivated by recent advances in the physics of ultrafast phenomena in the femto- and attosecond time scale - a regime within reach of novel light sources. New insights into fundamental many-body physics are expected when ultrafast atomic and solid-state processes can be monitored in real time.

Extended Theories of Gravity

Program

2—20 March 2015

Coordinators: Kari Enqvist, David Fonseca Mota, Fawad Hassan, Lavinia Heisenberg, Tomi Koivisto

www.nordita.org/xgrav2015

Videos from talks

The cosmological constant and the physics behind dark energy that accelerates the expansion of the universe remain among the biggest mysteries in theoretical physics. An intriguing possibility is that these problems stem from extrapolating Einstein's General relativity from the Solar system to the far infrared cosmological scales. In the other extreme, at the ultraviolet regime Einstein's theory encounters notorious infinities resulting in spacetime singularities and obstacles to quantisation, which suggest new gravitational physics with possible repercussions to early universe physics. The program aims at establishing new links between fundamental physics and cosmological and astrophysical experiments from the fruitful interface of extended theories of gravity.

2014

Water – the Most Anomalous Liquid

Program

13 October — 7 November 2014

Coordinators: Richard H. Henchman, Anders Nilsson, Lars G. M. Pettersson

www.nordita.org/water2014

Water is ubiquitous and a prerequisite to life as we know it, yet the fundamental origin in terms of structure and dynamics of its many anomalous properties is still under debate. No simulation model is currently able to reproduce these properties throughout the phase diagram. Experimental techniques, such as x-ray spectroscopies and x-ray and neutron scattering, femtosecond pump-probe and free-electron laser experiments in "no man’s land", provide data that stimulate new theory developments. This program brings together experimentalists and theoreticians in strong synergy to advance towards a unified picture of water.

Computational Challenges in Nuclear and Many-Body Physics

Program

15 September — 10 October 2014

Coordinators: Alexander Balatsky, Jorge Dukelsky, Roberto Liotta, Chong Qi, Ramon Wyss

www.nordita.org/cc2014

Advanced theoretical methods play a central role in answering the key questions of many-body physics. We intend to discuss and compare such methods as are being applied at present in nuclear physics, condensed matter, cold atoms and quantum chemistry. The computation techniques required to achieve an understanding of existing experimental data and in predicting with high reliability new properties and processes seem at present to be dispersed in the various fields.

Quantum Engingeering of States and Devices

Program

11 August — 5 September 2014

Coordinators: Sougato Bose, Reinhold Egger, Henrik Johannesson, Pasquale Sodano

www.nordita.org/qe2014

Experimental research on engineered quantum states and devices is progressing rapidly, providing special opportunities and challenges for the theorist. While the basic motivation draws from the wish to understand the intriguing coherence and correlation effects often featured, the prospects to use them for processing and storing quantum information has given the field an additional boost. The program aims at offering an interdisciplinary forum to further interactions among theorists working in different subfields of quantum engineered systems.

Novel Directions in Frustrated and Critical Magnetism

Program

14 July — 8 August 2014

Coordinators: Eddy Ardonne, Stephen Powell, Anders Sandvik

www.nordita.org/magnetism2014

In a frustrated system, competition between interactions hinders the tendency towards forming an ordered state, allowing for the emergence of new physical phenomena. This programme will bring together experts in the field of frustrated and critical magnetism as well as younger researchers, to discuss recent developments, explore connections between different areas of research, and generate new ideas.

Dynamics of Particles in Flows: Fundamentals and Applications

Program

2—27 June 2014

Coordinators: Fredrik Lundell, Bernhard Mehlig, Dhrubaditya Mitra, Federico Toschi

www.nordita.org/flows2014

The question of the dynamics of particles in flows has a wide range of applications. Examples are the dispersion of pollutants in the atmosphere, fuel injection in a car engine, rain formation in clouds, and planet formation in circumstellar accretion disks. These examples have in common that the fundamental processes (collisions, coalescence, or breakup of particles) are determined by similar microscopic equations.

What is the Dark Matter

Program

5—30 May 2014

Coordinators: Lars Bergström, Jan Conrad, Timur Delahaye, Joakim Edsjö

www.nordita.org/dm2014

The nature of Dark Matter is one of the most important outstanding problems in modern physics. Many Dark Matter models exhibit high dimensional parameter spaces with many degeneracies and considerable expected backgrounds, and therefore a combination of all experimental data available will likely be necessary to arrive at robust conclusions regarding the nature of dark matter. The aim of the program is to bring together experimentalists, phenomenologists and theorists in order to discuss ideas, methods and models for interpreting the vast amount of data available.

News in Neutrino Physics

Program

7 April — 2 May 2014

Coordinators: Mattias Blennow, Rikard Enberg, Tommy Ohlsson, Thomas Schwetz

www.nordita.org/nunews2014

The focus of this program is the theory and phenomenology of neutrino physics and the role of neutrinos in astrophysics and cosmology. Important issues include extended versions of the Standard Model of particle physics including massive neutrinos, using neutrinos for probing astrophysical environments, and confronting theories with measurements. We intend the program to be a workshop in the real sense of the word, with informal discussion meetings and ample opportunities for research and discussion of common projects.

2013

Lyman Alpha as an Astrophysical Tool

Program

2—27 September 2013

Coordinators: Matthew Hayes, Garrelt Mellema, Göran Östlin

www.nordita.org/alpha2013

This program is about the Ly α transition in Hydrogen and its astrophysical applications. Young stellar populations are dominated by massive, hot and short-lived stars that ionize their surroundings, which is hence a powerful, but complicated, probe of star forming and high redshift galaxies. This programs aims to bring together experts in modeling Ly α radiative transfer and galaxy formation, and observations of Ly α in local galaxies and the distant universe.

Superconductivity: the Second Century

Program

5—30 August 2013

Coordinators: Alexander Balatsky, Yunkyu Bang, Andrew Millis, Asle Sudbø

www.nordita.org/sc2013

Superconductivity has been of central scientific interest for more than a century, and yet the progress to date has been largely empirical: despite the tremendous progress in many-body theory there is as yet no general set of rules to predict and “design” new kinds of superconductors. With the rapidly growing list of new superconductors we feel it is time to have a high level workshop, bringing together theorists and experimentalists and focusing on the established facts and challenges in understanding the fundamental properties and basic mechanisms of superconductivity.

Beyond the LHC

Program

1—27 July 2013

Coordinators: Paolo Di Vecchia, Per Osland, Are Raklev

www.nordita.org/lhc2013

The 14 TeV LHC will look further above the electroweak scale, but where do we go beyond that to improve our understanding of the fundamental constituents of the Universe? Should we look to the results of a high-luminosity SLHC or a higher energy VLHC, do we need a precision linear collider at ILC or CLIC energies, are neutrino or flavour experiments essential to move forward, what can we learn from astrophysics?

Photo-Evaporation in Astrophysical Systems

Program

3—28 June 2013

Coordinators: Andreas Burkert, Barbara Ercolano, Garrelt Mellema, James Owen

www.nordita.org/photo2013

This programme brings together astrophysical theoreticians and simulators interested in radiative feedback, specifically the dynamical effects of radiative heating of dense gaseous structures, a process known as photo-evaporation, which occurs in regions of intense star formation, in the dense planet forming discs around young stars, in massive planets orbiting close to their parent star and even in the earliest phases of galaxy formation in the Universe. As part of the programme a 5-day workshop will address the latest observational and theoretical results.

Stability and Transition

Program

6—31 May 2013

Coordinators: Shervin Bagheri, Luca Brandt, Rama Govindarajan, Ardeshir Hanifi, Dan Henningson, Jens N. Sørensen

www.nordita.org/stability2013

Stability and transition of flows belong to fundamental issues in the field of fluid mechanics. Predicting flow structures and characteristics requires deep understanding of the different routes of transition. Further, similarities between the fluid behavior (instabilities) and different phenomena within the field of astrophysics give an opportunity to explain some of astrophysical phenomena based on the stability characteristics of canonical shear flows.

Differential Rotation and Magnetism across the HR Diagram

Program

8 April — 3 May 2013

Coordinators: Rainer Arlt, Petri Käpylä, Maarit Mantere

www.nordita.org/diff2013

The goal of the programme is to advance our understanding of the physical processes generating differential rotation in various types of stars, and the role that this effect plays for stellar magnetic activity and dynamos. The Sun is the only star for which the internal rotation profile is observationally known thanks to helioseismology – for other stars, only the surface differential rotation can be inferred from photometric or spectroscopic observations. The main goal of the program is to investigate the connection between the theories and observations and obtain better understanding of the generation and role of differential rotation for stellar magnetism.

Stochastic Thermodynamics

Program

4—15 March 2013

Coordinators: Erik Aurell, Ralf Eichhorn

www.nordita.org/st2013

Stochastic Thermodynamics represents an exciting new research direction in statistical physics, which explores fundamental aspects of non-equilibrium processes. The developments summarized under this term may be characterized by the common idea to adapt and generalize concepts from equilibrium thermodynamics to the non-equilibrium realm, typically on the level of single particle trajectories monitored over the entire system evolution.

Pushing the Boundaries with Cold Atoms

Program

21 January — 15 February 2013

Coordinators: Jonas Larson, Emil Lundh, Jani-Petri Martikainen, Chris Pethick, Päivi Törmä

www.nordita.org/cold2013

During the last years, numerous achievements have been presented in the research with cold atoms, such as realizations of; various lattice models, synthetic gauge fields, orbital physics, disordered systems, non-equilibrium dynamics, dipolar gases, and many-body cavity QED. This program will gather both experamentalists and theoriticians for discussions and presentations of these topics as well as others.

2012

Perspectives of Fundamental Cosmology

Program

5—30 November 2012

Coordinators: Martin Bojowald, Kristina Giesel, Sabine Hossenfelder, Mairi Sakellariadou

www.nordita.org/cosmology2012

Current cosmology provides a fascinating mix of a wealth of new observational data with deep conceptual problems still to be addressed. Several approaches in the general context of quantum gravity aim at a fundamental description of the relevant stages in the history of the universe, but none of them appears to be fully convincing and comparisons between different directions are difficult to draw. This workshop brings together a large set of experts, from both fundamental and phenomenological theory, in order to provide a snapshot of the current status and to focus future activities.

The Holographic Way: String Theory, Gauge Theory and Black Holes

Program

1—26 October 2012

Coordinators: Troels Harmark, Niels Obers, Marta Orselli, Donovan Young

www.nordita.org/holo2012

Videos from talks

Holography has emerged as one of the most fascinating and powerful new concepts in modern theoretical physics. Some of the most exciting current and future advances in the field build on two amazing prospects of the AdS/CFT correspondence, and thereby the Holographic Principle. On the one hand, the AdS/CFT correspondence offers a way to study strongly coupled gauge theories, and more generally strongly coupled systems with many degrees of freedom. Conversely, it offers a way for understanding the quantum states and the quantum behavior of black holes.

Spin-Related Phenomena in Mesoscopic Transport

Program

3—28 September 2012

Coordinators: Karl-Fredrik Berggren, Olle Eriksson, Michael Pepper, Ivan Shelykh

www.nordita.org/spin2012

Investigation of mesoscopic physics (nanometer scale systems) became a field of the intense research in last two decades, stimulated by the possibility of creation of nano-devices where the spin of the single particles could be an object of the precise manipulation and control. The workshop will seek to encourage interaction and information exchange between researchers working in the field of spin-related phenomena in various mesoscopic systems, as well as between experimentalists and theoreticians.

Topological States of Matter: Insulators, Superconductors, and Hall Liquids

Program

30 July — 25 August 2012

Coordinators: Eddy Ardonne, Annica Black-Schaffer, Hans Hansson

www.nordita.org/topology2012

Topological states of matter, such as topological insulators, topological superconductors, and quantum Hall liquids, are of great recent interest, both theoretically and experimentally. The purpose of this program is to gather experts on these different types of topological states, to discuss recent developments and create an exciting atmosphere where we can come up with new ideas.

Origin of Mass 2012

Program

28 May — 22 June 2012

Coordinators: Paolo Di Vecchia, Sten Hellman, Chris Kouvaris, Claudio Pica, Francesco Sannino, Kimmo Tuominen

www.nordita.org/mass2012

The program is dedicated to the present and future phenomenological impact of the first years of results from the Large Hadron Collider experiments at CERN. The aim is to have a very active scientific environment with theorists and experimentalists discussing the latest results and investigating future directions. During the event several topics will be discussed ranging from model building to collider phenomenology with the various links to cosmology. The 3rd week of the program is dedicated to the Mass 2012 Conference.

Biology and Physics of Information Processing

Program

16 April — 11 May 2012

Coordinators: John Hertz, Peter Latham, Yasser Roudi

www.nordita.org/info2012

In biological systems, proper function crucially depends on dealing with large amounts of information received from a usually noisy environment. Filtering out the noise, finding structure in the incoming information, memorizing this information, and eventually using it for generating proper response are fundamental operations performed by these systems. The scale at which these operations are performed ranges from individual cells to multispecies communities.

Dynamics of Biomolecular Processes: From Atomistic Representations to Coarse-Grained Models

Program

27 February — 23 March 2012

Coordinators: Hans Behringer, Ralf Eichhorn, Stefan Wallin

www.nordita.org/dbp2012

This program focuses on the different methods for modeling the dynamics of biomolecular systems, ranging from force-field based all-atom representation of individual biomolecules to coarse-grained models for multi-component systems. In particular, the link between these 'complementary' modelling approaches, which cover distinct length and time scales, is of central interest.

Exact Results in Gauge-String Dualities

Program

23 January — 17 February 2012

Coordinators: Lisa Freyhult, Vladimir Kazakov, Charlotte Kristjansen, Joseph Minahan, Konstantin Zarembo

www.nordita.org/exact2012

There has been remarkable progress in understanding non-perturbative dynamics of gauge fields and their relationship to string theory in recent years. Many important developments have been made by using methods of exactly solvable systems. The topics will include (i) exact results in the AdS/CFT correspondence (ii) scattering amplitudes (iii) supersymmetric gauge theories (iv) Bethe ansatz and exact solvability in quantum field theory

2011

Geometry of Strings and Fields

Program

1 November — 3 December 2011

Coordinators: Ulf Lindström, Maxim Zabzine

www.nordita.org/geometry2011

Videos from talks

The 4-week program will be devoted to geometrical subjects motivated by string theory, and to recent developments in string theory and related physical fields (quantum field theory) which are of strong geometrical interest. While the program will cover all areas of interaction between string theory and geometry, to provide additional focus we will emphasize particular subareas such as: the application of supersymmetry in differential geometry, generalized geometry, vertex algebras, topological field theories.

Foundations and Applications of Non-Equilibrium Statistical Mechanics

Program

19 September — 14 October 2011

Coordinators: Ralf Eichhorn, Hans Fogedby, Alberto Imparato, Carlos Mejía-Monasterio

www.nordita.org/neq2011

The program is centered around modern developments in non-equilibrium statistical mechanics both with respect to fundamental aspects (fluctuation theorems, entropy production, fluctuation-dissipation theorems) as well as applications (noise-induced phenomena, biophysical problems).

Studying Quantum Mechanics in the Time Domain

Program

22 August — 16 September 2011

Coordinators: Jan Petter Hansen, Eva Lindroth, Esa Räsänen

www.nordita.org/time2011

Thanks to novel light sources, ultrafast atomic and solid-state processes in the femto- and attosecond time scale can be monitored in real time.

Dynamo, Dynamical Systems and Topology

Program

25 July — 19 August 2011

Coordinators: Axel Brandenburg, Alexander Kosovichev, Henrik Lundstedt

www.nordita.org/dynamo2011

Understanding the origin of solar and stellar magnetic field is one of the central problems of physics and astrophysics, and a key to understanding the cosmic magnetism, in general.

String Phenomenology

Program

30 May — 25 June 2011

Coordinators: Marcus Berg, Paolo Di Vecchia, Gabriele Ferretti

www.nordita.org/string2011

The program will try to cover what string theory has to say about physics beyond the Standard Models of both particle physics and cosmology. Topics may include but are not limited to: string effective actions, string instantons, stringy supersymmetry breaking, intersecting D-branes, generalized flux compactifications, inflation in string theory, string-inspired MSSM-like models and dark matter in those models.

Predictability; School on Data Assimilation

Program

26 April — 27 May 2011

Coordinators: Jenny Brandefelt, Axel Brandenburg, Geert Brethouwer, Allan Sacha BRUN, Erik Lindborg, Jonas Nycander

www.nordita.org/pred2011

Predicting the unpredictable is a challenge that is common to various physical systems whose dynamics is governed by the equations of fluid dynamics. The oldest example is weather prediction. Other examples include climate prediction, space weather forecast, and solar cycle forecast. The mathematics developed for these applications is extremely interesting and deserves more detailed understanding, so that these techniques can be used also in other areas where the application of this technique is less well developed.

Applications of Network Theory: From Mechanisms to Large-Scale Structure

Program

28 March — 20 April 2011

Coordinators: Petter Holme, Petter Minnhagen

www.nordita.org/network2011

The main idea is to convene key world-class researchers on complex networks and let them interact freely with the Nordic groups interested in the area. The program will be divided into four thematic areas: biological networks, general network theory, technological networks, and social networks. Many of the intended participants are interested in several of these points.
A more intense, 3-day workshop will be arranged during the middle of the program.

The Return of De Sitter

Program

28 February — 18 March 2011

Coordinators: Ariel Goobar, Fawad Hassan, Stefan Hofmann

www.nordita.org/desitter2011

Research topics to be covered include: cosmological probes of dark energy, induced gravity on higher codimension surfaces and defects, K–essence, alternatives to the cosmological constant, technical naturalness as a qualified guide to new physics, vacuum structure, and stringy perspectives.

2010

The Influence of Confinement on Phase Transitions (Part 2)

Program

12—17 December 2010

Coordinators: S. T. Bramwell, O. Eriksson, B. Hjörvarsson, Anders Rosengren

www.nordita.org/conf2010-2

The impressively successful classical theories on phase transitions are based on the thermodynamic limit, which implies infinitely large or small extension on all the systems that are considered. These theories fail, however, to address many important aspects, as finiteness in extension is apparent in most physical systems. The question is of highly generic nature and has significance within condensed matter physics, chemistry as well as biology.
This program will run in two installments: 15 February-1 March and 12-17 December 2010.

Random Geometry and Applications

Program

1 November — 10 December 2010

Coordinators: Zdzislaw Burda, Bergfinnur Durhuus

www.nordita.org/randgeo2010

The concept of Random Geometry covers a variety of techniques and methods. These include the physics of interfaces in statistical mechanical systems, polymer and membrane physics, the theory of propagating strings relevant in high-energy physics, the functional integral approach to quantum gravity, the description of gene regulatory networks as well as of computer networks and their use in the design of algorithms, and also random graphs and random maps with important applications in physics, combinatorics and probability theory.
Two workshops, 1-2 November and 6-7 December, and a mini-conference, 22-23 November, are planned during the program period.

Quantum Information

Program

27 September — 29 October 2010

Coordinators: Ingemar Bengtsson, Gunnar Björk, Mohamed Bourennane

www.nordita.org/qinfo2010

The interdisciplinary field of quantum information processing and communication connects at its deepest level quantum mechanics, photonics, solid state physics, atomic physics, and electronics with computer science and information theory in order to gain features in cryptography, communication, and computing that are impossible to achieve using classical methods. Quantum information science has also revitalized the discussions about the foundations of quantum theory. This field has grown explosively and is now one of the hottest subfields of both computer science and physics.

Quantum Solids, Liquids, and Gases

Program

19 July — 27 August 2010

Coordinators: Egor Babaev, Emil Lundh, Jani-Petri Martikainen, Christopher Pethick, Mats Wallin

www.nordita.org/qslg2010

The program will focus on frontiers in physics of quantum solids, liquids and gases (defined in a broad sense).

Integrability in String and Gauge Theories; AdS/CFT Duality and its Applications

Program

31 May — 9 July 2010

Coordinators: Lisa Freyhult, Joseph Minahan, Shiraz Minwalla, Giuseppe Policastro, Konstantin Zarembo

www.nordita.org/integrability2010

The program has two main themes: Integrability in N=4 gauge theories and AdS/CFT duality and its applications to eg. quark-gluon plasmas, non-relativistic CFTs, hydrodynamics, and condensed matter systems.
An objective of the program is to support interaction between the two main themes. It is anticipated that specialists from each group will be simultaneously present, allowing for the exchange of new ideas between the two groups.
The 2010 conference on Integrability in Gauge and String Theories (IGST2010) will be held at the program site from 28 June to 2 July.

Turbulent Boundary Layers and Turbulent Combustion

Program

6 April — 28 May 2010

Coordinators: Henrik Alfredsson, Axel Brandenburg, Geert Brethouwer, Nils Erland L. Haugen, Arne Johansson, Philipp Schlatter

www.nordita.org/turbulence2010

This program has two related focus areas, each of which culminate in a 2-day conference.
Turbulent boundary layers, appearing on solid surfaces of bodies submerged in fluids and in channel and pipe flows, have been the focus of experimental and analytical investigations for almost a century. Still there are several unresolved issues even related to fairly basic mechanisms.
In turbulent combustion there are also many unresolved problems, such as how a turbulent premixed flame propagates. The importance of basic research in connection with energy production is evident. Simulations are important, because questions regarding the temperature distribution cannot easily be addressed experimentally.

The Influence of Confinement on Phase Transitions (Part 1)

Program

15 February — 1 March 2010

Coordinators: S T Bramwell, O. Eriksson, B. Hjörvarsson, Anders Rosengren

www.nordita.org/conf2010

The impressively successful classical theories on phase transitions are based on the thermodynamic limit, which implies infinitely large or small extension on all the systems that are considered. These theories fail, however, to address many important aspects, as finiteness in extension is apparent in most physical systems. The question is of highly generic nature and has significance within condensed matter physics, chemistry as well as biology.
This program will run in two installments: 15 February-1 March and 12-17 December 2010.

2009

Multiscale Modeling and Simulation in Science

Program

2—29 November 2009

Coordinators: Axel Brandenburg, Aatto Laaksonen, Olof Runborg, Kenneth Ruud, Anders Szepessy, Hans Ågren

www.nordita.org/multiscale2009

This four-week event joins a school, a scientific program and a conference, where teachers, students and scientists in computational science and engineering will be brought together to present, discuss and solve problems in areas of reserach involving multiple scales.

Solar and Stellar Dynamos and Cycles

Program

26 September — 26 October 2009

Coordinators: Maarit Korpi, Alexander Kosovichev

www.nordita.org/dynamos2009

Understanding the origin of solar and stellar magnetic fields is one of the central problems of physics and astrophysics, and a key to understanding the cosmic magnetism, in general. The first two weeks of the programme are dedicated to stellar dynamo theory and observations, and the last two for solar magnetic activity, dynamos and data assimilation methods. The 5th-6th of October there is a special workshop in the honor of the 70th birthday of Professor Ilkka Tuominen.

Neutron Stars. The Crust and Beyond

Program

14—25 September 2009

Coordinators: Nils Andersson, Lars Samuelsson

www.nordita.org/neutron2009

Bringing together experts on neutron star dynamics, condensed matter and nuclear physics, surface layers and the magnetosphere, the key questions taht will be discussed are: What input from microphysics calculations do we need to build realistic theoretical models? What bounds can the dynamical models in conjunction with observations provide on the state of matter at extreme densities? How do we use observations to constrain these parameters? If a neutron star is oscillating, how does information of the oscillations propagate to the observers?

Quantum Hall Physics. Novel Systems and Applications

Program

17 August — 11 September 2009

Coordinators: Eddy Ardonne, Thors Hans Hansson, Anders Karlhede, Susanne Viefers

www.nordita.org/qhp2009

The aim of this workshop is to bring together a group of theorists with a broad and varied range of competences in numerical techniques, low energy effective theories, conformal field theory and lattice models, but with quantum Hall phenomena as a common interest.

Electroweak Phase Transition

Program

15 June — 31 July 2009

Coordinators: Mark Hindmarsh, Stephan Huber, Kari Rummukainen

www.nordita.org/ew2009

The exciting prospect of exploring the Higgs sector of the Standard Model and its presumed extensions at the LHC has renewed interest in electroweak baryogenesis and the electroweak phase transition.

Physics of Relativistic Flows

Program

4 May — 13 June 2009

Coordinators: Juri Poutanen, Felix Ryde

www.nordita.org/flows2009

Relativistic jets are responsible for the huge luminosities seen in active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts and are probably launched from the central black holes in these objects. The details of the jet launching mechanism, its acceleration, mechanisms of the energy dissipation, particle acceleration and the emission remain unknown.

Astroparticle Physics - A Pathfinder to New Physics

Program

30 March — 30 April 2009

Coordinators: Joakim EDSJÖ, Steen HANNESTAD, Tommy OHLSSON

www.nordita.org/app2009

The research topics to be covered at the program are: neutrino physics, dark matter, cosmology, supersymmetry, dark energy, inflation, extra dimensions, ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, supernovae, leptogenesis.
We intend to keep the program rather loose what concerns seminars, thus giving more time for actual research and discussing future research projects among the participants of the program.

Theoretical Assessment and Prediction of the Biological and Environmental Effects of Nano Materials

Program

6—28 March 2009

Coordinators: Emppu Salonen, Ilpo Vattulainen

www.nordita.org/nano2009

The environmental and health effects of nanomaterials are of global concern, both in view of assessing the impact of nanomaterials discharged into nature and for a safe and transparent development of nanotechnology, especially in relation to novel applications in biomedicine.
The aim of this scientific program is to establish an international think-tank of researchers excelling in state-of-the-art computational and analytical theoretical methods to assess these and related issues.

2008

Geometrical Aspects of String Theory

Program

15 October — 15 December 2008

Coordinators: Ulf Lindström, Maxim Zabzine

www.nordita.org/gast2008

Ever since the birth of superstring theory, interaction with geometry has been one of the primary driving forces that has led to progress. On one hand, string theory has generated many new geometrical concepts; and on the other hand new ideas from geometry have often found their first applications in string theory.
Within the program there will be the "Geometrical Aspects of String Theory" workshop and "The 22nd Nordic Network Meeting on Strings, Fields and Branes"

TeV scale physics and dark matter

Program

1 June — 31 July 2008

Coordinators: Katri Huitu, Per Osland

www.nordita.org/tev2008

The Standard Model of Elementary Particle Physics suffers from a number of inconsistencies and requires extreme fine-tuning of parameters in some areas. This has led to the widespread belief that the Standard Model is the low-energy effective theory of some more fundamental theory in which all, or most, of the difficulties plaguing it are removed. The search for this more fundamental theory is one of the main enterprises of theoretical elementary particle physics.
Within the program there will be the "2nd Nordic Workshop on LHC and Beyond".

Physics of distributed information systems (PhysDIS)

Program

5—31 May 2008

Coordinators: Mikko Alava, Erik Aurell

www.nordita.org/physdis2008

Statistical physics has recently applied been to understanding, analysis and design of large distributed information systems. These range from decoding algorithms (Belief Propagation) and phase transitions and typical-case hardness in combinatorial optimization problems to content distribution and dynamical phenomena on the Internet, to the modelling of distributed agent systems - Peer-to-Peer networks, auction mechanisms and more. The PhysDIS program aims to survey current trends in this exciting area, and foster new research into untapped directions.

Turbulence and Dynamos

Program

17 March — 11 April 2008

Coordinators: Maarit Korpi, Anvar Shukurov, Kandaswamy Subramanian

www.nordita.org/turbulence2008

The origin of astrophysical magnetic fields remains controversial. The intense progress in nonlinear and turbulent dynamo theory of the last ten years has prepared ground for imminent fundamental progress in this area. The programme will bring together experts in various relevant areas in order to (1) identify the critical problems to allow further rapid progress, (2) focus the effort on the most fruitful areas of research and (3) establish new collaborations, especially those between theoreticians and observers, that might ensure such a progress.

Origins of Homochirality

Program

1—29 February 2008

Coordinators: Anja C. Andersen, Axel Brandenburg, Raphaël Plasson

www.nordita.org/homochirality2008

Videos from talks

Homochirality is a unique property of living matter, and a property that gradually disappears after death. The origin of homochirality is therefore closely linked to the origin of life, which makes this topic a prominent research field in astrobiology.

2007

Quantum Fluids

Program

15 August — 30 September 2007

Coordinators: Egor Babaev, Hans Thors Hansson, Anders Karlhede, Susanne Viefers, Mats Wallin, Frank Wilczek

www.nordita.org/qf2007

Focus of the program: quantum fluids, Bose-Einstein condensates, supersolids, quantum hall systems, exotic states such as projected quantum fluid states of metallic hydrogen, topological defects and vortex matter in quantum fluids.

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6 Dec 2016

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